Like, Look Like, To Be Like

In one of our previous posts, we dealt with Present Simple and its use in Law Enforcement English. When police officers interrogate a witness and they want to get to know some details about a perpetrator, they might ask the witness: “What does the perpetrator...

New Course: Patrolling

In this course, we will focus on topics that will come up during patrolling. For example, when performing an identity check, one has to learn about personal details as well as personal description. Mind you, these are suggested materials. Vocabulary and Expressions:...

148 Free Oxford Graded Readings

Reading is among some of the most useful way of improving one’s vocabulary and overall language skill. Due to COVID-19, Oxford University Press has made available 148 graded readers for free until August 31. Graded readers are really nice entryways to a...

Trace, track, mark, clue or lead?

The French criminologist, Dr. Edmond Locard, was a pioneer in forensic science, as he formulated that “every contact leaves a trace”. The Sherlock Holmes of France – as he was often called – in his famous principle stated that when a crime is...